Tuesday, May 24, 2011

How to Make Your Own Gluten-Free Flour Blends



Today I think I may have persuaded a friend with mysterious symptoms (sounding like gluten-sensitivity to me) to try going off gluten for a while to see how she feels.  She bemoaned the fact that she has a bread maker** (and I know she is a star bread baker herself).  I suggested that she do some research to see how/if gluten-free bread works in bread machines (there seem to be quite a few articles indicating it does).

We also talked about the various gluten-free breads that are commercially available.  My favourites are Udi's and the Chia Bread (by Silver Hills).  But there are both pretty pricey and I believe that you could make your own, maybe with a few tweaks, just by doing some research for good recipes on line.  (There are also some very baaaaaad-tasting gluten-free breads available commercially-- hopefully their number will diminish).

I told you a while ago that I purchased The Gluten-Free Bible and am enjoying not just the recipes, but also the other invaluable GF information.  After talking to my friend I looked up the page on Gluten-free flour blends.  It is interesting that bread and other baked products that are gluten-free need to be made up of a 'blend' of several flours to replicate the many functions that wheat flour performs... wheat flour contains both starch and protein.  No one GF flour provides both starch AND protein.  However,  by combining both starchy and protein-y GF flours, you can achieve a pretty credible alternative to wheat flour (and without the nasty gluten!).  Following is a great GF blend for Breads and another All-Purpose GF blend that you can use for other baked goods (the ones without yeast in them):

GF Flour Mix for Bread Recipes (for yeast breads and buns, etc.)    

  • 1 C. Brown Rice Flour
  • 1 C. Sorghum Flour
  • 3/4 C. Millet Flour
  • 1 C. Tapioca Flour
  • 1 C. Cornstarch
  • 1/3 C. Instant Mashed Potatoes (unflavoured)
As mentioned previously, you can make your own flours with a high-speed blender like VitaMix, or an electric flour mill, or you can purchase flours ready-made.  Combine all the above in a large bowl and evenly-distribute with a whisk.  Double or triple the recipe if desired.  Put in the refrigerator in an air-tight container and use as called for with any yeast bread recipes.
All-Purpose GF Flour Blend for all non-Yeast Pastries

  • 1 C. White Rice Flour
  • 1 C. Sorghum Flour
  • 1 C. Tapioca Flour
  • 1 C. Cornstarch
  • 1 C. Almond OR Coconut Flour
If making your own Almond Flour, I suggest soaking the almonds and then drying them until very dry in a dehydrator before making the flour.  This is a very satisfying process.   Combine all the above ingredients together in a large bowl and make sure they are evenly distributed.  Double or triple the recipe.  Keep in an airtight container in the fridge.

**Many of today's electric breadmakers have an actual "Gluten-free" baking selection that can be made.  Gluten-free batter is generally scooped or poured into the breadmaker following many excellent recipes for breadmaker gluten-free bread.
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Disclaimer:This blog reflects my own personal beliefs about the health benefits of being gluten-free. I am not a Medical or Health Care professional and any information or products contained in this blog are not meant to replace your responsibility to consult with the appropriate health care provider about your own circumstances and concerns. I am also an affiliate for many of the products promoted on this site meaning that I get a commission if you click and purchase. Thank you for supporting my continued ability to provide information through this website.

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